22 November 2022

Tineke Lenstra joins the EMBO Young Investigator Programme

Elize Brolsma

Elize Brolsma

Elize is part of Oncode’s communication team. She has over 10 years of experience in the com-munication industry, both for commercial and non-profit organisations. After obtaining her bache-lor and master degree in communication at Utrecht University, Elize worked as a communication professional at a research institute, PR agency, law firm and internet company. She has a strong focus on external communications and Public Relations. At Oncode - together with her colleagues - Elize produces the monthly newsletters for Oncode Investigators & Researchers and the Oncode digital magazine. She publishes content for the Oncode website and is responsible for all social media channels. She enjoys discussing science with researchers and support them in their outreach.

EMBO just announced 24 life scientists as the newest members of the EMBO Young Investigator Programme. One of the new members is Oncode Investigator Tineke Lenstra (Netherlands Cancer Institute), with her project on understanding transcriptional bursting in single cells. The Young Investigator Programme supports excellent group leaders who have been in independent positions for less than four years and have an excellent track record of scientific achievements.

“I am honoured to be selected for this prestigious program,” says Lenstra. “It feels like an encouragement that we are on the right track with our research. Membership of the YIP program provides exciting opportunities for our lab to connect with the European young investigator network and to potentially start new collaborations.“

“EMBO welcomes the new Young Investigators with a sense of excitement and pride,” says EMBO Director Fiona Watt. “One of the most remarkable things about this wonderful community is its diversity of expertise. Participation in the programme supports young group leaders at a critical phase of their careers, providing opportunities to develop their laboratories, learn from one another, and make lifelong connections within a supportive network.”

EMBO Young Investigators receive an award of 15,000 euros in the second year of their tenure and can apply for additional grants of up to 10,000 euros per year. They also benefit from a broad range of practical support, including networking opportunities for them and their lab members, mentoring by EMBO Members, training in areas such as leadership skills and responsible conduct of research, and access to core facilities at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL).

More information about the programme is available at: www.embo.org/funding/fellowships-grants-and-career-support/young-investigator-programme

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